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Green 39;s Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition Download


Green's Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition: A Comprehensive Guide for Upper Extremity Surgeons




If you are a hand surgeon or an upper extremity surgeon who wants to stay updated on the latest advances and techniques in your field, you need to have a copy of Green's Operative Hand Surgery. This book is widely recognized as the gold standard reference in hand surgery. It provides complete coverage of the surgical and nonsurgical management of all upper extremity conditions. Whether you are a resident or a fellow who wants to learn the basics or a practitioner who wants to improve your outcomes and solve complex cases, this book has something for you.


In this article, we will give you an overview of what Green's Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition has to offer. We will highlight the new features, updates, and innovations in this edition. We will also give you some tips on how to use the book effectively. Finally, we will give you a glimpse of some of the topics covered in this book.




green 39;s operative hand surgery 8th edition download



Anesthesia




Anesthesia is an essential part of hand surgery. It can affect the patient's comfort, safety, satisfaction, recovery time, and surgical outcome. Therefore, it is important to choose the right type of anesthesia for each patient and procedure.


In this section of Green's Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition, you will learn about: Types of anesthesia for hand surgery




There are four main types of anesthesia for hand surgery: general, regional, local, and WALANT (wide awake local anesthesia no tourniquet). Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, depending on the patient's medical condition, preference, and cooperation, as well as the surgeon's skill, experience, and comfort level. You will learn how to select the most appropriate anesthesia option for each scenario and how to optimize the patient's experience and outcome.


Techniques and tips for anesthesia administration




Once you have decided on the type of anesthesia, you need to know how to perform it safely and effectively. In this section, you will learn the basic principles and techniques of anesthesia administration for hand surgery. You will also get some practical tips and tricks from the experts on how to avoid common pitfalls and complications. You will learn how to perform various nerve blocks, such as axillary, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, interscalene, median, ulnar, radial, digital, and wrist blocks. You will also learn how to use ultrasound guidance, nerve stimulators, and local anesthetics to enhance your accuracy and efficacy.


Complications and management of anesthesia




As with any medical intervention, anesthesia carries some potential risks and complications. These can range from minor and transient to serious and life-threatening. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the possible adverse events and how to prevent and treat them. In this section, you will learn about the common complications of anesthesia for hand surgery, such as hematoma, infection, nerve injury, systemic toxicity, allergic reaction, hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, and pain. You will also learn how to manage these complications using appropriate measures, such as aspiration, antibiotics, steroids, antihistamines, vasopressors, atropine, antiemetics, analgesics, and nerve exploration.


Infections




Infections are one of the most common and challenging problems in hand surgery. They can cause significant morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed and treated promptly and properly. They can also compromise the function and appearance of the hand. Therefore, it is essential to have a thorough knowledge of the microbiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infections in hand surgery.


In this section of Green's Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition, you will learn about: Acute infections of the hand




Acute infections of the hand are usually caused by bacteria that enter through a break in the skin or a foreign body. They can affect any structure or compartment of the hand, such as the skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascia, tendon, nerve, vessel, bone, joint, or synovial sheath. They can present with various signs and symptoms, such as pain, swelling, redness, warmth, pus, fever, lymphadenopathy, and impaired function. They can also lead to serious complications, such as necrotizing fasciitis, compartment syndrome, septic shock, and amputation. Therefore, it is important to recognize and treat acute infections of the hand as early as possible. In this section, you will learn how to diagnose and treat common acute infections of the hand, such as cellulitis, abscesses, paronychia, felon, and pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis. You will also learn how to perform various surgical procedures for drainage and debridement of infected tissues.


Chronic infections of the hand




Chronic infections of the hand are usually caused by bacteria that persist in the hand despite adequate treatment or by organisms that are difficult to eradicate, such as mycobacteria, fungi, or biofilm-forming bacteria. They can affect any structure or compartment of the hand, but they often involve the bone or the joint. They can present with various signs and symptoms, such as pain, swelling, stiffness, deformity, sinus tract formation, fistula formation, osteolysis, and impaired function. They can also lead to serious complications, such as osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, chronic osteomyelitis with secondary amyloidosis (COSA), and malignant transformation. Therefore, it is essential to have a high index of suspicion and a comprehensive workup for chronic infections of the hand. In this section, you will learn how to manage chronic infections of the hand, such as osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, tuberculosis, fungal infections, and implant-related infections. You will also learn how to perform various surgical procedures for excision and reconstruction of infected tissues.


Prevention and prophylaxis of infections




Prevention is better than cure, especially when it comes to infections in hand surgery. Infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality, as well as increased costs and litigation. Therefore, it is imperative to prevent infections in hand surgery patients by using various measures, such as sterile techniques, antibiotic prophylaxis, wound care, and vaccination. In this section, you will learn how to prevent infections in hand surgery patients by following the latest guidelines and recommendations from the literature and the experts. You will also learn how to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of your infection prevention strategies.


Tendon Injuries




Tendon injuries are one of the most common and complex problems in hand surgery. They can affect the function and appearance of the hand significantly. They can also pose many challenges for the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of the patients. Therefore, it is crucial to have a thorough understanding of the anatomy, biomechanics, physiology, pathology, and repair techniques of the tendons in the hand.


In this section of Green's Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition, you will learn about: Extensor tendon injuries




Extensor tendon injuries are usually caused by trauma, such as lacerations, crushes, burns, or bites. They can affect any part of the extensor mechanism of the hand and wrist, such as the central slip, lateral bands, sagittal bands, juncturae tendinum, extensor retinaculum, or extensor hood. They can present with various signs and symptoms, such as pain, swelling, bleeding, loss of extension, deformity, crepitus, and impaired function. They can also lead to serious complications, such as adhesions, stiffness, delayed primary repair, secondary repair, grafting, and tenolysis.


Fractures




Fractures are one of the most common and challenging problems in hand surgery. They can affect the function and appearance of the hand significantly. They can also pose many difficulties for the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of the patients. Therefore, it is vital to have a thorough understanding of the anatomy, biomechanics, classification, and fixation techniques of the fractures in the hand.


In this section of Green's Operative Hand Surgery 8th Edition, you will learn about: Fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges




Fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges are usually caused by trauma, such as falls, crushes, punches, or sports injuries. They can affect any part of the metacarpals and phalanges, such as the head, neck, shaft, base, or articular surface. They can present with various signs and symptoms, such as pain, swelling, bruising, deformity, malrotation, shortening, angulation, and impaired function. They can also lead to serious complications, such as nonunion, malunion, infection, stiffness, arthritis, and nail deformity. Therefore, it is important to recognize and treat fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges as soon as possible. In this section, you will learn how to diagnose and treat fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges, such as boxer's fracture, Bennett's fracture, Rolando's fracture, phalangeal neck fracture, tuft fracture, and intra-articular fractures. You will also learn how to perform various techniques for fracture fixation, such as closed reduction and percutaneous pinning, open reduction and internal fixation, external fixation, and intramedullary nailing.


Dislocations and ligament injuries of the digits




Dislocations and ligament injuries of the digits are usually caused by trauma, such as hyperextension, hyperflexion, or lateral stress. They can affect any joint of the digits, such as the metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), or distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints. T


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